Black Mourning Awareness Pin

This black mourning awareness pin outlined in silver is a subtle yet stylish way to indicate that the wearer is mourning. Can be worn on clothing, outer wear, or even mounted on a vehicle visor.

Black Silicone Wristbands Adult, Youth and Child

Embossed silicone bracelet with the word “REMEMBER” with black ribbon awareness symbols in front and behind. A perfect way to mourn for those who prefer an alternative style to a pin.

black fabric awareness ribbon
Black Mourning Awareness Ribbon

This black mourning awareness ribbon is a simple yet very effective way to express a state of mourning. An economical way to provide something for larger events and memorials.

Black Memorial Armband

Sports teams, clubs, schools, or any group wanting to honor the life of someone who has died find these a fitting way to express their grief and acknowledge the significance of their loss. Available in 9” and 12” circumference.

Does anyone know where I can find a copy of the rules of thought, feeling, and behavior in these circumstances? It seems like there should be a rule book somewhere that lays out everything exactly the way one should respond to a loss like this. I'd surely like to know if I'm doing it right. Am I whining enough or too much? Am I unseemly in my occasional moments of lightheartedness? At what date am I supposed to turn off the emotion and jump back on the treadmill of normalcy? Is there a specific number of days or decades that must pass before I can do something I enjoy without feeling I've betrayed my dearest love? And when, oh when, am I ever really going to believe this has happened? Next time you're in a bookstore, as if there's a rule book
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way: A Memoir
“Unless you have been very, very lucky, you have undoubtedly experienced events in your life that have made you cry. So unless you have been very, very lucky, you know that a good, long session of weeping can often make you feel better, even if your circumstances have not changed one bit.”
Lemony Snicket, Horseradish: Bitter Truths You Can't Avoid
“Deep grief sometimes is almost like a specific location, a coordinate on a map of time. When you are standing in that forest of sorrow, you cannot imagine that you could ever find your way to a better place. But if someone can assure you that they themselves have stood in that same place, and now have moved on, sometimes this will bring hope.”
Elizabeth Gilbert, Eat, Pray, Love
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