Practically  Together. . .

At times we need solitude to process our emotions. However, at other times it is important that we allow other people in to support us and be together with us as we grieve.  Sometimes the help we need is not emotional but in dealing with the practical changes that have occurred as a result of the death of our loved one.  The following will give you information to find the help that suits your need.

Are you struggling to cope with your grief and sadness?

Seek out counselling help.  Whether you need the specialized education of a psychologist or just someone safe to talk to, a counsellor is a good resource. Also, many counselling agencies have programs to assist those who could not otherwise afford counselling services. Another good resource is a church. Many churches offer a variety of formal programs as well as having staff available for individual assistance. You usually do not need to follow a particular faith or belong to a specific church to access their programs or other staff. Churches aim to help all people regardless of their personal belief system.

Has the loss of your loved one changed your financial situation?

Whether you have insurance money to decide what to do with, or you need to figure out how to manage the loss of your loved one’s income to your budget, a financial planner can assist you. Financial planners can be found at your local bank, online or  in the yellow pages.

Are you overwhelmed or not sure who to contact for help?

A social worker is someone who helps identify where you need help, can assist you with solutions to your problems, or help you find the right agency to assist you with your area of difficulty. To find a social worker contact the Canadian Association of Social Workers (contact information below) and ask for your province’s contact information.

Has the loss of your loved one caused you to question your belief in God?

Often times the death of a loved one causes us to question the meaning of life, our sense of spirituality and perhaps even our own mortality. A pastor at a church can help you talk through these questions. You do not need to belong to a particular religious group or denomination. Pastors are available to speak with you regardless of your beliefs. If you don’t feel comfortable going to a church or talking to a pastor, remember that God is always available regardless of where you are or what time it is.

Practical help. . .

Agencies to look for in your area:

  • Crisis support centres
  • Counselling centres
  • Local churches

Canada

Canadian agencies. . .

Focus on the Family

Focus on the Family is a non-profit organization that aims to assist individuals by providing specific types of care.  Whether you need advice, support or encouragement, Focus on the Family can help you.  Along with a website full of resources (in English and French) they also offer personal counselling (including a free one-time consultation), and prayer support.

Canadian Association of Social Workers

Canadian Mental Health Association

Government agencies 

  • Service Canada – a federal government agency which offers a variety of programs, benefits and services
  • Provincial government websites – each province has its own government website with a variety of resources and links to other agencies.

It is so important to not grieve alone; take the time to find someone to share your journey with you.

“Contrary to what a lot of people believe (or hope), comfort doesn’t take the pain away. Comfort slides in beside the pain, pulling up a chair so that we have something more than sorrow in our hearts. Comfort gently expands our spirits so that we can breathe again. Comfort opens our eyes so that we can see possibility again. And on those days, whether it is the next day or five years removed, on that day when grief rears its dark head again, comfort helps us remember that pain is not all there is”
Peggy Haymes, Strugglers, Stragglers and Seekers: daily devotions for the rest of us
Everyone keeps telling me that time heals all wounds, but no one can tell me what I’m supposed to do right now. Right now I can’t sleep. It’s right now that I can’t eat. Right now I still hear his voice and sense his presence even though I know he’s not here. Right now all I seem to do is cry. I know all about time and wounds healing, but even if I had all the time in the world, I still don’t know what to do with all this hurt right now.”
Nina Guilbeau, Too Many Sisters
“You can never recover from losing a person you love, but you can find a way to let it be part of your life rather than letting it take over every part of you.”
Darien Gee, Friendship Bread
© Grieving Together 2013. All rights reserved.
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