Practically  Together. . .

At times we need solitude to process our emotions. However, at other times it is important that we allow other people in to support us and be together with us as we grieve.  Sometimes the help we need is not emotional but in dealing with the practical changes that have occurred as a result of the death of our loved one.  The following will give you information to find the help that suits your need.

Are you struggling to cope with your grief and sadness?

Seek out counselling help.  Whether you need the specialized education of a psychologist or just someone safe to talk to, a counsellor is a good resource. Also, many counselling agencies have programs to assist those who could not otherwise afford counselling services. Another good resource is a church. Many churches offer a variety of formal programs as well as having staff available for individual assistance. You usually do not need to follow a particular faith or belong to a specific church to access their programs or other staff. Churches aim to help all people regardless of their personal belief system.

Has the loss of your loved one changed your financial situation?

Whether you have insurance money to decide what to do with, or you need to figure out how to manage the loss of your loved one’s income to your budget, a financial planner can assist you. Financial planners can be found at your local bank, online or  in the yellow pages.

Are you overwhelmed or not sure who to contact for help?

A social worker is someone who helps identify where you need help, can assist you with solutions to your problems, or help you find the right agency to assist you with your area of difficulty. To find a social worker contact the american association of social workers (contact information below) and ask for your province’s contact information.

Has the loss of your loved one caused you to question your belief in God?

Often times the death of a loved one causes us to question the meaning of life, our sense of spirituality and perhaps even our own mortality. A pastor at a church can help you talk through these questions. You do not need to belong to a particular religious group or denomination. Pastors are available to speak with you regardless of your beliefs. If you don’t feel comfortable going to a church or talking to a pastor, remember that God is always available regardless of where you are or what time it is.

Practical help. . .

Agencies to look for in your area:

  • Crisis support centres
  • Counselling centres
  • Local churches

United-States

American agencies. . .

Focus on the Family

Focus on the family is a non-profit organization that aims to assist individuals by providing specific types of care.  Whether you need advice, support or encouragement, focus on the family can help you.  Along with a website full of resources (in English and French) they also offer personal counselling (including a free one-time consultation), and prayer support.

The Moyer Foundation Resource Center

The Moyer Foundation Resource Center is an online collection of quality resources, offering personalized support and information for children and families facing life’s most difficult challenges including grief.  The Moyer Foundation also offers Camp Erin, a bereavement program for children and teens grieving the death of a loved one, with 46 locations across the US and Canada

  • Website: http://moyerfoundation.org/resources

American Association of Social Workers

  • Phone: 1-202-408-8600
  • Email: credentialing@naswdc.org
  • Website: www.social workers.org

American Mental Health Association

  • Website: mentalhealthamerica.net

Government agencies 

  • Service USA – a federal government agency which offers a variety of programs, benefits and services
  • State government websites – each state has its own government website with a variety of resources and links to other agencies.
  • Other United States of America information coming soon

It is so important to not grieve alone; take the time to find someone to share your journey with you.

I am always saddened by the death of a good person. It is from this sadness that a feeling of gratitude emerges. I feel honored to have known them and blessed that their passing serves as a reminder to me that my time on this beautiful earth is limited and that I should seize the opportunity I have to forgive, share, explore, and love. I can think of no greater way to honor the deceased than to live this way.”
Steve Maraboli
“It's easier to miss her at a cemetery, where she's never been anything but dead, than to miss her at all the places where she was alive.”
John Scalzi, Old Man's War
When someone you love dies, you get a big bowl of sadness put down in front of you, steaming hot. You can start eating now, or you can let it cool and eat it bit by bit later on. Either way, you end up eating the whole thing. There's really no way around it.”
Ralph Fletcher, Fig Pudding
© Grieving Together 2013. All rights reserved.
Facebook
Facebook
Pinterest
Pinterest
RSS
Follow by Email
Google+
https://grievingtogether.ca/what-now/support/usa-info/